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‘Our most serious competitor’: China in a Biden Foreign Policy

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On February 4, 2021, President Biden made a significant speech, setting the agenda for this administration's foreign policy.

In that speech, Biden made this clear: "American leadership must meet this new moment of advancing authoritarianism, including the growing ambitions of China to rival the United States…And we'll also take on directly the challenges posed by our prosperity, security, and democratic values by our most serious competitor, China. We'll confront China's economic abuses; counter its aggressive, coercive action; to push back on China's attack on human rights, intellectual property, and global governance."

Does this mark a new chapter in US policy? Or is it a continuation of the Trump Administration's objectives? How will China react? What about America's allies in the region?

Moderator:

Dr. Christopher Ankersen, Clinical Associate Professor at NYU SPS Center for Global Affairs

Panelists:

Naima Green-Riley, Nonresident Fellow, Digital Forensics Research Lab, Atlantic Council and Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Government, Harvard University

Dr. Raymond Kuo, independent political scientist focused on international security in East Asia. He previously served as an Assistant Professor at Fordham University and has also worked for the United Nations, the National Democratic Institute, and the Democratic Progressive Party (Taiwan).

Ali Wyne, senior analyst with Eurasia Group's Global Macro practice, focusing on U.S.-China relations and great-power competition. He is also a nonresident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council's Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security and a nonresident fellow at the Modern War Institute.

DATE MARCH 24, 2021
TIME 6PM-7:15PM EST
LOCATION Virtual via Zoom
Contact sps.global.affairs@nyu.edu
DATE MARCH 24, 2021
TIME 6PM-7:15PM EST
LOCATION Virtual via Zoom
Contact sps.global.affairs@nyu.edu

RSVP HERE

On February 4, 2021, President Biden made a significant speech, setting the agenda for this administration's foreign policy.

In that speech, Biden made this clear: "American leadership must meet this new moment of advancing authoritarianism, including the growing ambitions of China to rival the United States…And we'll also take on directly the challenges posed by our prosperity, security, and democratic values by our most serious competitor, China. We'll confront China's economic abuses; counter its aggressive, coercive action; to push back on China's attack on human rights, intellectual property, and global governance."

Does this mark a new chapter in US policy? Or is it a continuation of the Trump Administration's objectives? How will China react? What about America's allies in the region?

Moderator:

Dr. Christopher Ankersen, Clinical Associate Professor at NYU SPS Center for Global Affairs

Panelists:

Naima Green-Riley, Nonresident Fellow, Digital Forensics Research Lab, Atlantic Council and Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Government, Harvard University

Dr. Raymond Kuo, independent political scientist focused on international security in East Asia. He previously served as an Assistant Professor at Fordham University and has also worked for the United Nations, the National Democratic Institute, and the Democratic Progressive Party (Taiwan).

Ali Wyne, senior analyst with Eurasia Group's Global Macro practice, focusing on U.S.-China relations and great-power competition. He is also a nonresident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council's Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security and a nonresident fellow at the Modern War Institute.