center for global
Course Pop-up: Weapons of Mass Destruction Non-Proliferation & Disarmament

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The NYU Center for Global Affairs is thrilled to announce the continuation of our webinar series, ��Course Pop-ups." Each Pop-up will be hosted by the instructor for an upcoming course at the CGA. We invite you to join us and hear more about new and timely topics and to experience a snapshot of what you'll learn as a student in the course!

Course Pop-up: GLOB1-GC 2055, Weapons of Mass Destruction Non-Proliferation & Disarmament (listed under Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament).

In our Course Pop-up: Weapons of Mass Destruction Non-Proliferation & Disarmament, Clinical Associate Professor WPS Sidhu examines the linkages between the COVID-19 virus and biological weapons, and the implications of the pandemic for the study of WMDs. In his short lecture, "'COVID-19 & Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)," he explores what lessons can be learnt from the COVID-19 experience to prevent and mitigate the deliberate or accidental use of such lethal viruses. While the claim that COVID-19 is a man-made WMD has been largely discounted, the possibility that it was an accidental release from a laboratory has not. Additionally, the rapid spread of the virus has shown not only how a successful bio-attack might unfold, but also the lack of preparedness to deal with it. Does the 2021 Review of the Biological Weapon Convention provide an opportunity to strengthen the regime to effectively manage such pathogens? Or will existing geopolitical contestations stymie such cooperation? Professor Sidhu has more than 25 years experience in policy-related research on WMDs and the UN, and this expertise will inform his candid insights.

About the Course:

Nuclear, Biological, Chemical, and Radiological weapons, collectively designated as Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD), coupled with their delivery systems, continue to pose the greatest existential threat to humanity and the world. As long as they exist, there is every likelihood that they will be used either deliberately, by accident, or by miscalculation. Any WMD use would be catastrophic in human, political, economic, ecological, and moral terms. COVID-19, though not a weapon, has shown the devastating risks of a potential biological attack. Of all WMD, nuclear weapons, which were invented and used in 1945, pose the greatest danger. This course is designed to help understand the existing and emerging complex disarmament, arms control, and non-proliferation challenges related to WMD in general and nuclear weapons in particular.

 

REGISTER HERE

DATE MAY 13, 2021
TIME 12PM-12:30PM EST
LOCATION virtual
COST $Free
Contact graduate.global.affairs@nyu.edu
DATE MAY 13, 2021
TIME 12PM-12:30PM EST
LOCATION virtual
Contact graduate.global.affairs@nyu.edu
COST $Free

REGISTER HERE

The NYU Center for Global Affairs is thrilled to announce the continuation of our webinar series, ��Course Pop-ups." Each Pop-up will be hosted by the instructor for an upcoming course at the CGA. We invite you to join us and hear more about new and timely topics and to experience a snapshot of what you'll learn as a student in the course!

Course Pop-up: GLOB1-GC 2055, Weapons of Mass Destruction Non-Proliferation & Disarmament (listed under Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament).

In our Course Pop-up: Weapons of Mass Destruction Non-Proliferation & Disarmament, Clinical Associate Professor WPS Sidhu examines the linkages between the COVID-19 virus and biological weapons, and the implications of the pandemic for the study of WMDs. In his short lecture, "'COVID-19 & Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)," he explores what lessons can be learnt from the COVID-19 experience to prevent and mitigate the deliberate or accidental use of such lethal viruses. While the claim that COVID-19 is a man-made WMD has been largely discounted, the possibility that it was an accidental release from a laboratory has not. Additionally, the rapid spread of the virus has shown not only how a successful bio-attack might unfold, but also the lack of preparedness to deal with it. Does the 2021 Review of the Biological Weapon Convention provide an opportunity to strengthen the regime to effectively manage such pathogens? Or will existing geopolitical contestations stymie such cooperation? Professor Sidhu has more than 25 years experience in policy-related research on WMDs and the UN, and this expertise will inform his candid insights.

About the Course:

Nuclear, Biological, Chemical, and Radiological weapons, collectively designated as Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD), coupled with their delivery systems, continue to pose the greatest existential threat to humanity and the world. As long as they exist, there is every likelihood that they will be used either deliberately, by accident, or by miscalculation. Any WMD use would be catastrophic in human, political, economic, ecological, and moral terms. COVID-19, though not a weapon, has shown the devastating risks of a potential biological attack. Of all WMD, nuclear weapons, which were invented and used in 1945, pose the greatest danger. This course is designed to help understand the existing and emerging complex disarmament, arms control, and non-proliferation challenges related to WMD in general and nuclear weapons in particular.

 

REGISTER HERE